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Do Not Open: A Lettering Project by Erik Marinovich

via Do Not Open and Skillshare

AIGA Monogram by Jessica Hische
via Jessica Hische

AIGA Monogram by Jessica Hische

via Jessica Hische

Cherry Bounce label by Kyle Louis Fletcher
via Fonts in Use and Kyle Louis Fletcher

Cherry Bounce label by Kyle Louis Fletcher

via Fonts in Use and Kyle Louis Fletcher

Details from Flagsmith, a flag building typeface by Always with Honor and Scribble Tone

via I Love Typography and Flagsmith

Various design props for by Annie Atkins for Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel

via DesignWorkLife and Annie Atkins

Surveyor: A Mapmaker’s Letter, a new typeface by Hoefler&Co.

Surveyor is a new family of fonts inspired by the traditional mapmaker’s letter. It revives a style of lettering that’s unique to cartography, one that evolved in the early nineteenth century and endured for as long as maps were printed by engraving. Beyond reviving the shapes of these alphabets, Surveyor celebrates what maps do best, by providing an expressive typographic vocabulary to help designers articulate many different kinds of information.

via Hoefler&Co.

Plate from Monograms & Ciphers by A. A. Turbayne
via BibliOdyssey

Plate from Monograms & Ciphers by A. A. Turbayne

via BibliOdyssey

“Pijlteekens” from the Lettergieterij Amsterdam type specimen, 1916.

via the Klim Type Foundry Blog

Drop capital I by Claudia de Almeida for NY Magazine
via Claudia de Almeida

Drop capital I by Claudia de Almeida for NY Magazine

via Claudia de Almeida

Marian Bantjes Pretty Pictures

A monograph of Marian Bantjes’ work spanning from 2003–2012, with a foreword by Rick Poynor. Published by Thames & hudson in the UK, and by Metropolis Books in the USA.

via Marian Bantjes and Amazon

Designscheiß poster by Jan König
via Fonts in Use and Jan König

Designscheiß poster by Jan König

via Fonts in Use and Jan König

Monogram designed by Jessica Hische for 826 Valencia’s The Captain’s Log
The first in a series of limited edition journals featuring original designs by guest artists. 100% of the proceeds will benefit 826 Valencia, a nonprofit organization dedicated to encouraging literacy and excitement for learning among San Francisco and Bay Area youth.
via Jessica Hische

Monogram designed by Jessica Hische for 826 Valencia’s The Captain’s Log

The first in a series of limited edition journals featuring original designs by guest artists. 100% of the proceeds will benefit 826 Valencia, a nonprofit organization dedicated to encouraging literacy and excitement for learning among San Francisco and Bay Area youth.

via Jessica Hische

TRANS-1, 10 point, and TRANS-2, 10 point, from “About the Typefaces Not Used in This Edition” by Jonathan Safran Foer

TRANS-1, 10 POINT: This typeface refreshes itself continuously on the screen, words being replaced by their synonyms. Now autumn begins exists only for long enough to bring present fall commences into existence, which instantly disappears to make room for gift descend embarks, which dies so that talent alight boards ship can live. Trans-1’s creator, IS Bely (1972–), said that he hoped the typeface would illuminate the richness of language, the interconnectedness, the nuance of the web. But instead, Trans-1 reveals language’s poverty, its inadequate approximations, how a web is made of holes, how the river of words flows always away from us.

TRANS-2, 10 POINT: This typeface also refreshes continuously, but unlike Trans-1, words are replaced by their antonyms. Now autumn begins exists only for long enough to bring later spring ceases into existence, which instantly disappears to make room for presently dry riverbed persists, which dies so that never flowing water perishes can live. It was Bely’s intention, with Trans-2, to illuminate the poverty of language, its inadequate approximations, how a web is made of holes. But instead, we see the string connecting those holes, and caught in the net is the shadow of meaning.

This typeface frequently freezes in place, fixed on words that cannot be refreshed. What, after all, is the opposite of God? The meaning is liberated from the words by the typeface’s inability to translate them. These nonexistent antonyms are the reflections of the words we are looking for, the non-approximations, like watching a solar eclipse in a puddle. The antonym of God’s non-existent antonym is closer to God than God will ever be. Which, then, brings us closer to what we want to communicate: saying what we intend, or trying to say the opposite?

* * *

Selections from “About the Typefaces Not Used in This Edition” by Jonathan Safran Foer, a list of fictional responsive typefaces.

Read the whole thing at The Guardian