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Poster by Jay Shaw for the movie The Visitor
via Mondo Archive

Poster by Jay Shaw for the movie The Visitor

via Mondo Archive

Opening title sequence by yU+co for Oz the Great and Powerful

via Disney Movie Trailers and yU+co

Mars in Techniscope — and in 2MP sensor

On the left side: film stills from the 1964 movie Robinson Crusoe on Mars by Byron Haskin. Using a mix of optically composited special effects and shots taken in California’s Death Valley, they imagined into existence a landscape in beautifully stark images, filmed in the widescreen Techniscope format, that lend a visceral immediacy to this tale of survival’s sense of melancholy and isolation.

On the right side: photos taken by the Mars Curiosity rover, the most complex spacecraft ever sent to the red planet, joining rovers Opportunity and Spirit. Curiosity is equipped with over ten times the scientific instruments than its predecessors to aid on its two-year mission to learn whether the Martian environment could have been favourable for microbial life. 

via The Criterion Collection Current, The National Post and Digital Photography Review

Poster by Chris Ware for Jessica Yu’s Documentary In the Realm of the Unreal: The Mistery of Henry Darger
via Mean Sheets

Poster by Chris Ware for Jessica Yu’s Documentary In the Realm of the Unreal: The Mistery of Henry Darger

via Mean Sheets

Poster by Drew Struzan for The Thing
26” x 38” screen print, hand numbered edition of 435. Printed by D&L Screenprinting.
via Mondo

Poster by Drew Struzan for The Thing

26” x 38” screen print, hand numbered edition of 435. Printed by D&L Screenprinting.

via Mondo

Stormy Weather by Adrian Tomine 
Illustration for a review by Anthony Lane of the film Moonrise Kingdom, published in the June 4 & 11, 2012 issue of The New Yorker.
via Adrian Tomine News and I Watch Stuff

Stormy Weather by Adrian Tomine 

Illustration for a review by Anthony Lane of the film Moonrise Kingdom, published in the June 4 & 11, 2012 issue of The New Yorker.

via Adrian Tomine News and I Watch Stuff

Planet of the Apes poster by Non-Format
via Non-Format

Planet of the Apes poster by Non-Format

via Non-Format

Cover artwork for the Criterion Collection edition of Kindergarten Cop

Historically, the policier and the family comedy were two distinct categories. Then, in 1990, Kindergarten Cop gave us all a lesson in genre revisionism. With muscular sensitivity, Hollywood’s last action hero Arnold Schwarzenegger embodies detective John Kimble, who is compelled to go undercover as a teacher of five-year-olds in order to catch a ponytailed drug dealer. Though it’s distinguished by pulse-pounding suspense, a Crayola-bright palette by cinematographer Michael Chapman (Taxi Driver), and trenchant observations about education in the Bush I era, the film’s emotional center is Schwarzenegger’s gruff yet good-tempered interaction with a class full of precocious scamps, including a tumor-forewarning death-obsessive and a genitalia expert. By leavening a children’s film with enough violence to please even the most cold-hearted bastard, director Ivan Reitman shows that he refuses to color inside the lines.

via Criterion and Gawker

Cover artwork for the Criterion Collection edition of Kindergarten Cop

Historically, the policier and the family comedy were two distinct categories. Then, in 1990, Kindergarten Cop gave us all a lesson in genre revisionism. With muscular sensitivity, Hollywood’s last action hero Arnold Schwarzenegger embodies detective John Kimble, who is compelled to go undercover as a teacher of five-year-olds in order to catch a ponytailed drug dealer. Though it’s distinguished by pulse-pounding suspense, a Crayola-bright palette by cinematographer Michael Chapman (Taxi Driver), and trenchant observations about education in the Bush I era, the film’s emotional center is Schwarzenegger’s gruff yet good-tempered interaction with a class full of precocious scamps, including a tumor-forewarning death-obsessive and a genitalia expert. By leavening a children’s film with enough violence to please even the most cold-hearted bastard, director Ivan Reitman shows that he refuses to color inside the lines.

via Criterion and Gawker

Titles from the film Masculin Féminin: 15 Faits Précis by Jean-Luc Godard
via We Love Typography and Movie Title Stills Collection

Titles from the film Masculin Féminin: 15 Faits Précis by Jean-Luc Godard

via We Love Typography and Movie Title Stills Collection

Melancholia by Lars von Trier.

If I were choosing a director to make a film about the end of the world, von Trier the gloomy Dane might be my first choice. The only other name that comes to mind is Werner Herzog’s. Both understand that at such a time silly little romantic subplots take on a vast irrelevance. Doctor Johnson told Boswell: “Depend upon it, sir, when a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully.” In the cast of von Trier’s characters, impending doom seems to have created a mental state of dazed detachment. They continue to act as if their personal concerns have the slightest relevance. Von Trier has never made a more realistic domestic drama, depicting a family that is dysfunctional not in crazy ways but in ways showing a defiant streak of intelligent individualism.

excerpt from a review by Roger Ebert.

A piece by Neil Kellerhouse, the creative genius behind many great contemporary poster designs and criterion collection dvd covers, among others.
via his portfolio

A piece by Neil Kellerhouse, the creative genius behind many great contemporary poster designs and criterion collection dvd covers, among others.

via his portfolio

La Piel Que Habito (The Skin I Live In), Pedro Almodóvar’s new suspense thriller.
From a review by Phillip French:

The Skin I Live In is a skilful piece of storytelling that reorganises time and, in a characteristic Almodóvar fashion, challenges our preconceptions about everyday life and personal conduct. The title takes its central character’s profession and turns it into a metaphor for our bodies, our identities, our perceptions of ourselves. Skin is what contains us and appears to define us and, indeed, a crucial scene sees Robert’s wife mortified by looking at what has happened to her face. But would a transformation of our appearance or, more radically, the reorganisation of our bodies make us other than we know ourselves to be? As in all the films of his maturity from the mid-1990s onwards, Almodóvar, while often appearing camp and frivolous, memorably explores profound emotional and intellectual matters. He does in this cool, elegant and moving film, beautifully lit as usual by cinematographer José Luis Alcaine.

read the rest of the review here.

La Piel Que Habito (The Skin I Live In), Pedro Almodóvar’s new suspense thriller.

From a review by Phillip French:

The Skin I Live In is a skilful piece of storytelling that reorganises time and, in a characteristic Almodóvar fashion, challenges our preconceptions about everyday life and personal conduct. The title takes its central character’s profession and turns it into a metaphor for our bodies, our identities, our perceptions of ourselves. Skin is what contains us and appears to define us and, indeed, a crucial scene sees Robert’s wife mortified by looking at what has happened to her face. But would a transformation of our appearance or, more radically, the reorganisation of our bodies make us other than we know ourselves to be? As in all the films of his maturity from the mid-1990s onwards, Almodóvar, while often appearing camp and frivolous, memorably explores profound emotional and intellectual matters. He does in this cool, elegant and moving film, beautifully lit as usual by cinematographer José Luis Alcaine.

read the rest of the review here.

Opening title sequence for Gaspar Noé’s movie Enter the Void

Not sure who the designer is…