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Cover artwork by Chris Ware for Smoke Signal #17
via Desert Island

Cover artwork by Chris Ware for Smoke Signal #17

via Desert Island

Captain Marvel & Nancy by Jeremy Eaton from Cartoon Jumble
via Cartoon Jumble and Comic Art Collective

Captain Marvel & Nancy by Jeremy Eaton from Cartoon Jumble

via Cartoon Jumble and Comic Art Collective

Collage comic by Jillian Tamaki
via Jillian Tamaki’s blog

Collage comic by Jillian Tamaki

via Jillian Tamaki’s blog

Cover artwork by Chris Ware for The New Yorker, for the  September 17, 2012 and January 7, 2013 issues, titled “Back to School” and “Treshold.”

From an article by Chris Ware on the New Yorker website:

In September, I pictured, more or less, my daughter’s teacher and her class on a “back to school” cover […] that jokingly pointed to the free time that parents would have now that their kids were back in class; it was something I saw every morning, and I thought it would make a sort of funny picture. In the wake of Newtown, it didn’t seem so funny anymore. As parents and citizens, we entrust our children not only to the safety of schools but also to the nurturing and cultivated environment of schools and teachers. Education is the very foundation of civilization and cannot be undermined or undersold. That we now have to somehow consider an unchecked population of firearms as part of this equation seems absolutely ludicrous and terrifying.

via the New Yorker

Robert Goodin reinterprets the cover artwork for Donald Duck #35

Original cover by Carl Barks, Dell 1954. 

via Covered and Robert Goodin

c86:

Today’s Google Doodle is really special, marking the 107th anniversary of Winsor McCay’s Little Nemo in Slumberland

If you missed it, watch the animation HERE

Oak Park and River Forest posters by Chris Ware
via The Historical Society of Oak & River Forest

Oak Park and River Forest posters by Chris Ware

via The Historical Society of Oak & River Forest

“Eightball no. 18 Cover” by Daniel Clowes
via Daniel Clowes

Eightball no. 18 Cover” by Daniel Clowes

via Daniel Clowes

Poster for the Brooklyn Comics and Graphics Festival designed by Chris Ware
via D&Q and BCGF

Poster for the Brooklyn Comics and Graphics Festival designed by Chris Ware

via D&Q and BCGF

Cover artwork by Jacob Covey for Ernie Bushmiller’s Nancy is Happy: Complete Dailies 1943-1945 and Nancy Likes Christmas: Complete Dailies 1946-1948 

via Fantagraphics

Oak Park Magazine - Affection (False New Yorker Cover) by Chris Ware
Ink, blue colored pencil on paper, 2012. 29” x 20.25”
From the exhibition Chris Ware: Building Stories, presenting 126 original drawings by Chris Ware to coincide with the release of his new book Building Stories — a graphic novel, over ten years in the making, published by Pantheon in the form of 14 booklets collected in  box. 
The exhibition runs from September 8 to October 27 at Adam Baumgold Gallery in New York.
via Adam Baumgold Gallery

Oak Park Magazine - Affection (False New Yorker Cover) by Chris Ware

Ink, blue colored pencil on paper, 2012. 29” x 20.25”

From the exhibition Chris Ware: Building Stories, presenting 126 original drawings by Chris Ware to coincide with the release of his new book Building Stories — a graphic novel, over ten years in the making, published by Pantheon in the form of 14 booklets collected in  box. 

The exhibition runs from September 8 to October 27 at Adam Baumgold Gallery in New York.

via Adam Baumgold Gallery

Drowning Girl, or I Don’t Care! I’d Rather Sink

“I think my work is different from comic strips — but I wouldn’t call it transformation; I don’t think that whatever is meant by it is important to art.”
— Roy Lichtenstein

“The closer my work is to the original, the more threatening and critical the content. However, my work is entirely transformed in that my purpose and perception are entirely different. I think my paintings are critically transformed, but it would be difficult to prove it by any rational line of argument.”
— Roy Lichtenstein

“Roy’s work was a wonderment of the graphic formulae and the codification of sentiment that had been worked out by others. The panels were changed in scale, color, treatment, and in their implications. There is no exact copy.”
— Jack Cowart, executive director of the Lichtenstein Foundation

“Lichtenstein did no more or less for comics than Andy Warhol did for soup.”
— Art Spiegelman

Shown above:

Drowning Girl by Roy Lichtenstein, 1963. 

Lumpenstein (LSP Drowning) by Dave Hoffman, 2012.

Drowning Aquaman by John Trumbull, 2012.

Original artwork by Tony Abruzzo for “Run for Love!”, Secret Hearts, No. 83, November 1962, DC Comics. 

via La Biblia de los Pobres and Deconstructing Roy Lichtenstein and Wikipedia